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government and the a ring government that had the u.n. security council, not security comes, general assembly, in 1998, at which their rings agree to withdraw the threats. and after that there was a parody, a couple years when the british tried to make sure they were telling the truth and had been telling the truth the but before that there was kind of a step-by-step thing. i mean, i was pushing very hard to be allowed to just do ordinary professional things that writers do, such as -- i came out to be able to talk about, talk to my readers and things like that. all of this was a battle with security forces, internationally. and gradually we got a little more cooperation, and so that got done a little bit. i mean, the thing that really, have to say this, the thing that really make a big difference to in those years was this country. because america allowed me to come here for periods of time, which started off being short, like a week or 10 days, and ended up being much longer, like too much, too and as months at a time, and litter and ordinary free life. [applause] so i was allowed to make m
in government, u.n. poll sicks domestically. how do you weigh in on the ethics of using drone, and then second question, after the killing of bin laden, do you feel al-qaeda is more or less defeated? >> okay. good questions, both. on the subject of drones, i think they are the most significant advance in humanitarian warfare in history. i think that because the three principles of a just war are necessity, determination, and proportionality. necessity meaning are the people you are fighting, do you need to fight them? is there a way to deal with bin laden and other than shooting at them or capturing them? i come down strongly on the side of, no, these are irreconcilable. the next two questions are making sure that you're targeting the right people and that you're striking targets with the level of force required and no more; right? now, think about it, drones give you more than any tool in history the ability to make sure you are hitting the right target. doesn't mean they don't make mistakes, but you have a better chance of reaching that 100% goal with a drone than you do firing a shell or dr
several examples of massive united nations lead interventions where the u.n. moved in and established a presence in iraq and afghanistan. it was u.s. and nato lead. in the middle east and north africa particularly in these countries we are discussing something new is happening. in some respects the international community learning to do things differently. we are not going back to what we have done in the last 20 years. we are going to do it in a different way and has an international community we are learning what that process is and if you are on the ground you can see it. a lot of people -- there's a hesitancy about this intervention and this involvement that is quite telling and wasn't there in the past. >> thank you. >> i would like to know -- i am abigail woodward and i would like to know how women's rights are being protected and advanced and i would like to know if the muslim brotherhood has seen this debate impediment to that and how the constitutions are including them. >> let's start with the most significant case, constitutional issues and the role of the muslim brotherhoo
're in a place with a weak government, you have perhaps a u.n. operation in the international coordination is also leadership. you have confusion. i think one of the highest hurdles to overcome is the residual feeling, often among ngos that they will be contaminated if they do a cooperation with the military. but most places, it's only the military but has been rebuffed logistic capacity to project not only power, but to project water treatment units and sanitation equipment into a remote area and to take people out from the remote area who need more sophisticated care. so if you don't have the leadership on the ground, it can help reach those gaps of confusion. there's also continuing intellectual political task. obviously some groups, the red cross and quakers have a long tradition of relating to the military on the battlefield and knowing how to deal with the potential sense of conflict of perspective. but i think that's a dialect that has to be extended to all of these other groups that are active. i think some are fairly pragmatic. i think doctors would have orders right now. and ther
, we're talking about lincoln as an extreme leader, as an un unfitterred leaders, but there's home court advantages. tell us what effect the seating had as the convention plays out. >> guest: so lincoln's team is able to receipt sprouterrers -- recruit supporters from all across illinois. they bring them in chicago on discounted tickets. lincoln was a railroad attorney so they arranged that. they print fake tickets for the convention and stack the hall to the rafters with lincoln supporters. every time lincoln's name is mentioned, supporters yell and scream support so much so that the windows of the hall shake in response. this makes the convention dense. no one can think. davis, lincoln's campaign manager goes to the seating arrangement guys saying i want the new york delegation where weed is seated to be surrounded on all sides by other strong seward states. davis knows the condition will be such a zoo they can't hear themselves think or talk to each other at any distance. if weed is like this when the negotiations have to start, he's going to be physically blocked off from getti
for conflict. and i would look to the state department to carry this into the u.n. so that we get to the international forum particularly if it continues to escalate. member to come to frame that a declaratory policy for the nations that are not -- that have the servers that may not be partisan bidding so that it's clear, and then to start to think of other diplomatic actions that could potentially be taken to cut off the escalation of this activity or its attacks on us or on a larger group etc. >> but i don't want to take off the table actions on the diplomatic actions because i think that we have exhausted many of the potential diplomatic actions. and so we need to think about what are ways to send a strong signal to the leadership in x land and other places by some other actions in putting perhaps covert action. >> quick question, so far the u.s. government has said nothing publicly about who is behind the attacks. there's speculation in the media based on the leaks of incredible sources that the u.s. government has said nothing publicly. what is your decision as to whether or
to the war, but he never denies that he voted to une give callly thank the president for the war effort in iraq. >> moderator: ms. ericson? ericson: the f-35s are designed to carry targeted, smart nuclear bombs. the issue isn't six minutes of noise a day, the issue is nuclear proliferation. now, when i was a child in the early 1960s, vermont was the garden of eden. since bernie sanders came in, vermont's gone to hell. and we've got to stop this hell that he's putting us through. we've got to stop the f-35. we've got to stop nuclear proliferation. sure, they can have it down in south carolina, but we can at least just say no to it here in vermont. now, there are other serious problems with the f-35. we have a problem with solar flares. nasa says the solar flares are going to continue for another year. they disrupt communication, and because solar flares disrupt communication, we can end up with one of these nuclear bombs detonating in the burlington, vermont. .. the military machine would be called into question by, we, the people, saying this is what i want to get done or not get done,
institutions like the un and world bank that they were all designed to be weak, they were all designed to play a secondary role to nations whose sovereignty we saw as inviolable. i don't think that is sustainable because so many of the interests you or i have as individual citizens of wherever we come from are really affected by decisions that happen on a global stage. >> host: david rothkopf is our guest. numbers are on the screen if you'd like to participate in this author:2 your 2-585-3885. in east and central time zones 585-3886. if you live in the mountain and pacific time zones, mr. rothkopf, former managing director of kissinger associates and current ceo of foreign policy. what is foreign policy? >> guest: divisional, washington post foreign policy magazine, the foreign policy website which is not much bigger than the magazine, three million visitors on the web site and runs a series of events and other programs on international issues. >> host: mr. rothkopf, in "power, inc." you have a chapter about a swedish boat. what is that story? >> guest: i wanted to go to the origin story of th
't work for anyone but u.n. scrupulous employers. we need to take the power out of the hands of those that are exploiting our current immigration situation and put it back in the hands of workers in fair and honest employers. if the workers have a legal status, employers can't skirt labor laws and so they would have to pay fair wages and abide by the rules. immigration reform is the right thing to do as well as the economically smart thing to do. children shouldn't have to live in fear of their parents deportation every day of their lives and some of the hardest working most vulnerable people in our society shouldn't have to be subject to exploitation and harassment. finally, i would just like to say that i am truly appreciative of the support that we have received from the urban league and other african-american leaders on this issue i know that there have been in tensions in the past. the reverend of dr. martin luther king jr. when we have those we have to embrace them so we can pass them. this is our time to come together to break those issues down. let's get a solution on this iss
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9

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